Panamint Models 19th Century Trucks


These 19th-century wood beam (et al) trucks are built-to-order by shapeways.com (based on 3-D designs supplied by Eric Cox of Panamint Models - panamintmodels@aol.com). They are comprised of "UV Curable Acrylic Plastic" (a material that is somewhat brittle and fragile). Each truck is available in three different mounting configurations - "S" (screw mount), "P" (bolster pin mount), or "B" (Bachmann "old-timer" car mount). Wheelsets and couplers not included.


These 48" wheelbase Baltimore & Ohio wood beam / leaf spring trucks (catalog #T01) are modeled after a type used in the 1840s and 1850s -


These 48" wheelbase "live spring" trucks (catalog #T02) are modeled after a type that was popular on the Baltimore & Ohio from the 1830s to 1855 (for both freight and passenger service). They were also popular on some southern roads (where they were used up until the Civil War). Other roads used them into the 1880s (freight service only). Trucks of this design used roller-style body bearings and either a wooden or cast iron bolster holding half elliptic leaf springs (which support the journals in lieu of sideframes). One truck per pair is equipped with brakes (as per common practice) -


These 48" wheelbase basic wood beam trucks (catalog #T04) are modeled after a type in common use from the 1840s until the 1870s. Features include slanted journals and canister coil springs -


These 48" wheelbase wood beam trucks (catalog #T05) are modeled after a type in common use from the 1840s until the 1870s. Features include cannister coil springs and brakes. The flat journal boxes are of a type most often seen in Civil War photos by Russell, Brady, etc -


These 54" wheelbase wood beam trucks (catalog #T06) are modeled after a type in common use from the 1850s until the 1870s. Features include india rubber springs and brakes -


These 60" wheelbase wood beam trucks (catalog #T07) are modeled after a type used by the Baltimore & Ohio (and related roads) in the 1850s and 1860s. Features include leaf springs and swing motion hangers. Each truck is equipped with brakes (as per prototype practice) -


These 52" wheelbase Eaton & Gilbert wood passenger trucks (catalog #T10S) are typical of 1840-1865 practices, with rubber springs, equalizer, brakes. Modeled after a NY&Harlem car drawing by Henz, 1861. The same truck appears in a photo of an 1850s Jackson & Sharp car and in several Civil War photos of Pennsylvania/USMRR equipment -


These 48" wheelbase wood beam trucks (catalog #T12) are modeled after a type used by the B&O, L&N and other roads from around 1864 until the late 1870s -


These 54" wheelbase wood beam trucks (catalog #T30) are modeled after a type used by the US Military Railroad during the Civil War. One of many similar types made by various builders (starting with the PRR in the late 1850s), this design was the last hurrah for the widespread use of wood sideframes in freight service. Features include cannister coil springs, decorative spring plank columns, and brakes. The flat journal boxes are of a type most often seen in Civil War photos by Russell, Brady, etc -


These offset 5' V&T passenger trucks are based on a prototype used from 1860-1890 (catalog #'s T43P, T44P and T45P) -


These wood beam passenger trucks (catalog #T52) are modeled after a type used by the CB&Q (et al) from around 1866 until 1900 (although they are virtually identical to many other similar trucks with short-hanger swing motion) -


These wood beam passenger/caboose trucks (catalog #T57 and #T58) are modeled after the CB&Q's "Type 7" truck that was used from around 1866 until 1900. They were also used on waycars as recently as 1980 and are appropriate for the Union Pacific's wooden and early steel cabooses -


These 46" wheelbase metal / continuous-frame "New England" trucks (catalog #T60) are modeled after a type used by the NYNH&H and other roads from around 1850 until 1885 -


These iron frame passenger car trucks (catalog #T62S) were used by Eaton and Gilbert carbuilders of Troy, New York (probably under a Williams patent design). These unequalized trucks equipped a sample car sent to the Wurttemberg Railways in 1845, of which a contemporary model exists in the Deuteches Museum -


These 58" wheelbase wood bolster / diamond archbar trucks (catalog #T70) are modeled after the "Cleveland" pattern (1860s-1880s) -


This is an early Cleveland-style rigid archbar truck with inside brakes for close clearances (catalog #T71). The 55" wheelbase is similar to what the Pennsylvania used in the 1870s-90s -


These 56.5" swing motion, wooden bolster, archbar freight trucks (catalog #T81) follow the Allen or "California" design. This type has a shorter wheelbase and different details than the Panamint T82 Allen. It also has an early style slide-up journal cover. Modeled after the 1866 patent drawing in JH White Jr's book American Railroad Freight Car. Outside brakes on both trucks hung from the car's underfloor on the prototype -


These 66" wheelbase wood bolster / swing-motion archbar trucks (catalog #T82) are modeled after an Allen patent prototype. Referred to as "California" trucks, these were popular with western roads from around 1866 until the 1880s -


Used by various narrow gauge lines in the 1870s and 80s, these Nn3 trucks (catalog #T83) were known as "Type A" trucks on the Denver, South Park and Pacific -


These 58" wheelbase Fox pressed steel trucks (catalog #T95) are modeled after a prototype used in the early 1890s -


These 66" wheelbase Fox pressed steel trucks (catalog #T97) are modeled after a prototype used by the B&M, NYC, Reading and other roads from the 1890s until 1910 -



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